Debate

Blockbuster pricing: why is the Matisse exhibition so expensive?

It’s billed as a five-star, must-see, once-in-a-lifetime experience. And tickets for the exhibition of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs at Tate Modern are already selling fast. Advance booking is recommended, and the Tate website warns anyone rash enough to turn up without a ticket that they can expect a lengthy queue for entry.

For those who can’t make the journey to London, there is the compensation of the film of the exhibition “coming to a cinema near you” on 3 June, now part of the standard marketing of a blockbuster exhibition.

Critics’ response to the exhibition has been almost unanimously positive. The display been described as sensitive and serious: no small achievement in curating art that is superficially so decorative and apparently so familiar.

However well we thought we knew Matisse’s joyous graphic images from reproductions in print and online, it turns out there is no substitute for seeing the delicate layers and precise colours of the gouaches découpés. That is, if you don’t mind edging your way in front of each artwork and then craning your neck to see from behind the row of heads that inevitably form a barrier between you and the object of the exhibition.

Continue reading at The Conversation.

BBC News – Southbank Centre puts Festival Wing plans on hold

Plans for a £120m revamp of Londons Southbank Centre have been placed on hold after Mayor Boris Johnson intervened in a row over the position of a skatepark. The proposals would see the skatepark relocated 120m, but the Mayor insisted last month it should not be moved. Withholding the planning application was a “big setback”, the Southbank Centre said.

via BBC News – Southbank Centre puts Festival Wing plans on hold.

This is a selection of articles and online resources relating to questions of cultural value and institutional development, which provide some of the context and background to our research.

Nicholas Hytner attacks Southbank Centre redevelopment plans | The Guardian

It is neighbours at war, but this time the controversial extension is no normal conservatory, but a glazed hall big enough for a symphony orchestra.

On one side is the director of the National Theatre, Sir Nicholas Hytner, who has launched a stinging attack on the £120m redevelopment plans proposed by the next-door Southbank Centre, championed by its artistic director, Jude Kelly.

via The Guardian.

Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry faces the axe in funding cuts – Manchester Evening News

The Museum of Science and Industry (Mosi) – which welcomes thousands of families each year – could be shut down under plans being considered by the national Science Museum Group.

The shocking announcement also puts in jeopardy the National Media Museum in Bradford and the National Rail Museum in York.

The three northern visitor attractions, which are all part of the London-based museum group, have been put on the chopping block because of funding cuts.

via Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry faces the axe in funding cuts – Manchester Evening News.

London Calling: The Latest Twist in the Tale of London’s Concrete Island | ArchDaily

The QEH and Hayward Gallery have been under question from the 1980s when, first off, Terry Farrell planned to immerse them in a kind of polychromatic Post-Modern Pop palace. Subsequently Richard Rogers envisioned a glass wave as tall as the Royal Festival Hall rolling over the Hayward and QEH intended to offer visitors the kind of environment they would normally expect in Provence or Catalonia, but not in cool, damp London.

via London Calling: The Latest Twist in the Tale of London’s Concrete Island | ArchDaily.